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Karl Knauer apprentices harvest sweet reward for latest eco project

Abschlussbild Bienenprojekt

Protecting insects in collaboration with Bienenmartins Imkerei

 

In spring, work began on a very special future-oriented project at Karl Knauer AG. With help from the packaging specialist, a new workspace was created for Karl Knauer's newest employees on a 2,600-metre site in Zell am Harmersbach. The newly created flower meadow is close to Bienenmartins Imkerei, and blooms with lots of different varieties throughout the summer, offering a habitat for all kinds of insects, but especially for the new Karl Knauer bee colony. “Bees are vital for our eco system. They pollinate wild and cultivated plants and are therefore the main reason why we are able to bring in harvests. Plus, they maintain economic diversity by helping to propagate plants,” explains beekeeper Martin, who is supporting the environmental project.

While the approx. 60,000 industrious Karl Knauer bees were busy filling their hives, i.e. their combs, with honey, the apprentices at Karl Knauer drew attention to the project via social media. An information board and a banner at the meadow itself were also created to provide information on the packaging specialist's latest environmental protection project.

At the end of June, it was time: Equipped with protective clothing, the Karl Knauer apprentices began their honey harvest under the expert guidance of beekeeper Martin. A total of 32 kilograms were collected and filled into jars by hand. As you would expect from a packaging expert, a specially constructed honeycomb packaging was designed and created for the honey. The gold-filled glass jars were perfectly presented and safely positioned in the packaging, so that they could start out on their journey as very special customer gifts and as ambassadors for biodiversity conservation. “Holding a filled honey jar in your hands and knowing you’ve made a significant contribution to the protection of bees is a wonderful feeling! Our meadow of native wildflowers serves as a valuable habitat,” concludes apprentice Theresa Seckinger. “We're hoping that it gives customers and those living in Biberach food for thought and that we find environmentally conscious imitators.” The bee project has therefore been worthwhile for all those involved and will, according to Karl Knauer, be continued next year.

Beekeeping apprentices
Beekeeping apprentices
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Information board on the bee project
Information board on the bee project
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Apprentices at the beehive
Apprentices at the beehive
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Bienenkasten
Bienenkasten
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Banner zum Bienenprojekt
Banner zum Bienenprojekt
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Abschlussbild Bienenprojekt
Abschlussbild Bienenprojekt
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